Professional Integrity

Conflict of Interest in Nutrition Research

Conflict of Interest in Nutrition Research

There is a growing concern about bias and conflict of interest in the nutrition research landscape. Given the influence of systematic review and meta-analysis on nutrition policy, it has been suggested that industry sponsorship can undermine the integrity of nutrition research by investing heavily in studies that support their products and skew the systematic review process [1-3]. Out of 206 articles in a 2007 search, 111 declared financial sponsorship and the odds ratio of a favorable versus unfavorable result was 7.61 when comparing articles with all industry funding to no industry funding [2]. A systematic review of systematic reviews regarding the association between SSBs and weight gain found that those reviews with conflict of interest were five times more likely to present a conclusion of no positive association than those without [4]. A search of obesity-related arguments made by the food industry in major newspapers found suggestions that industry is “part of the solution” in 33% of the articles [5]. Other themes in the reframing of obesity included that government intervention is overreaching (25%), that products are not responsible (24%), that individuals are not responsible (15%), and that obesity is not a problem (3%) [5]. Not surprisingly, similar biases stemming from study sponsorship on the relationship between artificially sweetened beverages and weight have been found [6]. Dr. Marion Nestle has argued that corporate funding of food and nutrition research can seem more like marketing than science [7]. There exists an urgent need for improved disclosure practices and refined methods for evaluating studies used in systematic reviews. Given the obesity crisis and growing food addiction problem, reducing corporate sponsors from driving research agendas should be considered both a high public health and journal editorial board priority.

For more information on Conflict of Interest in Nutrition Research, check out our Dietitians for Professional Integrity Homepage

Dietitians for Professional Integrity 2

  1. Katan, M.B., Does industry sponsorship undermine the integrity of nutrition research?PLoS Med, 2007. 4(1): p. e6.
  2. Lesser, L.I., et al., Relationship between funding source and conclusion among nutrition-related scientific articles.PLoS Med, 2007. 4(1).
  3. Lucas, M., Conflicts of interest in nutritional sciences: The forgotten bias in meta-analysis.World J Methodol, 2015. 5(4): p. 175-8.
  4. Bes-Rastrallo, M., et al., Financial conflict of interest and reporting bias regarding the association between sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: A systematic review of systematic reviews.PLoS Med, 2013. 10(12).
  5. Nixon, L., et al., “We’re Part of the Solution”: Evolution of the Food and Beverage Industry’s Framing of Obesity Concerns Between 2000 and 2012.Am J Public Health, 2015. 105(11): p. 2228-36.
  6. Mandrioli, D., C.E. Kearns, and L.A. Bero, Relationship between Research Outcomes and Risk of Bias, Study Sponsorship, and Author Financial Conflicts of Interest in Reviews of the Effects of Artificially Sweetened Beverages on Weight Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Reviews.PLoS One, 2016. 11(9): p. e0162198.
  7. Nestle, M., Corporate Funding of Food and Nutrition Research: Science or Marketing?JAMA Intern Med, 2016. 176(1): p. 13-4.
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Food Politics Video

Nutrition in Recovery is thrilled to announce our new monthly newsletter! Get the latest information on Nutrition for Addiction! Check out our latest video on Food Politics!

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness.

We send out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered:

Alcoholic Liver Disease

Attentional Bias

Vaping (E-cig)

Bariatric Surgery

Child Nutrition

Circadian Rhythms

Men and Eating Disorders

View last month’s video on Night Eating Syndrome

Nutrition in Recovery

Please SIGN UP HERE so you will not miss out on this revolutionary information!

Do you know someone who might be interested in the link between nutrition and mental health or any of the topics mentioned above? Please forward this to them so they can join us and don’t keep us a secret!

Thank you for all your support as we embark on the journey of improving the health and wellbeing of our clients and their loved ones.

Have thoughts about Food Politics? Reach out to us, we would love to hear your thoughts!

 

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David Wiss Speaking Schedule 2018

Mr. David Wiss has a passion for speaking at the podium. He is not afraid of large crowds. He loves to create PowerPoint presentations summarizing the latest research related to nutrition and substance use disorder, as well as other topics such as eating disorders, microbiome, food politics, and public health. Here you will find the David Wiss speaking schedule for 2018.

Speaking Schedule 2018 

Tuesday March 6, 2018 12:00pm – 2:30pm

Sober College: 6022 Variel Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 91367

DESCRIPTION

Nutrition and Fitness in Recovery
CAMFT#140434

David Wiss, MS, RDN & Ken Niemann, MA, DC

About the Course:
We all know how important it is to pay attention to nutrition and fitness. Maintaining Body/Mind balance is especially important for those in recovery. Join the amazing David Wiss, founder of Nutrition in Recovery, and the ever-energized Ken Niemann, Fitness Director for Sober College, as they discuss the different elements of nutrition and fitness that help with neurochemical balance and optimized physical well-being.

2 Free CEUs for Addiction & Mental Health Professionals*

Open to all who register here. Free. Lunch provided.

Schedule:
12:00pm – 12:30pm – Check-in & Lunch (Not included in CE Hours)
12:30pm – 2:30pm – “Nutrition and Fitness in Recovery” (CE Course)

Friday March 16, 2018 1:15pm – 2:15pm

Alabama Dietetic Association Annual Meeting

Birmingham Jefferson Civic Center (East Hall), Birmingham, Alabama

TITLE: Nutrition for Substance Use Disorder Recovery: Gut-Brain

David Wiss MS RDN 

Lecture Objectives:

  1. Discuss the impact of addictive substances on nutritional status and gastrointestinal health
  2. Explore disordered and dysfunctional eating patterns in addicted populations
  3. Propose nutrition therapy guidelines for specific substances and for poly-substance abuse

 

More information and registration here

Saturday April 14, 2018 One Day Conference 9:00am – 3:45pm

Los Angeles District of the California Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Conference:

“One Size Does Not Fit All: Promoting Diverse Perspectives in Dietetics”

TITLE: Shortcomings of the Evidence Base in Dietetics 10:50am – 11:20am

David Wiss MS RDN 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the challenges with conducting nutrition-related research
  2. Identify limitations, sources of bias, and other conflict in the current evidence base
  3. Suggest practice strategies when evidence is limited

 

More information and registration here

Saturday June 2, 2018 2:00pm – 3:30pm

West Coast Symposium on Addictive Disorders (WCSAD)

La Quinta, CA. May 31 – June 3, 2018

TITLE: Nutrition for Substance Use Disorder Recovery: Gut-Brain

David Wiss MS RDN 

DESCRIPTION

The prevalence of substance use disorders continues to rise with a significant impact on families, communities, and the healthcare system. The current opioid crisis suggests a need to re-assess entrenched treatment protocols for addictive disorders. Classically, treatment includes mental health services such as psychopharmacology and individual and group therapy sessions. There is little data about the role of physiological recovery particularly nutrition during early recovery. It is well known that substance use disorders are associated with neglected health including nutritional deficiencies. There is recent evidence linking the gut and brain, suggesting that proper dietary intake is critical for mental health. Substance use disorder treatment protocols may benefit from including nutrition services as a treatment modality.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Discuss the impact of addictive substances on nutritional status and gastrointestinal health
  2. Explore disordered and dysfunctional eating patterns in addicted populations
  3. Propose nutrition therapy guidelines for specific substances and for poly-substance abuse

 

More information here (registration opens in March)

Thursday July 12, 2018 1:15pm-2:15pm

9th Annual National Collegiate Recovery Conference – Associate of Recovery in Higher Education

Houston, TX. July 9- July 12, 2018.

TITLE: Nutrition for Substance Use Disorder Recovery: Gut-Brain

David Wiss MS RDN 

DESCRIPTION

The prevalence of substance use disorders continues to rise with a significant impact on families, communities, and the healthcare system. The current opioid crisis suggests a need to re-assess entrenched treatment protocols for addictive disorders. Classically, treatment includes mental health services such as psychopharmacology and individual and group therapy sessions. There is little data about the role of physiological recovery particularly nutrition during early recovery. It is well known that substance use disorders are associated with neglected health including nutritional deficiencies. There is recent evidence linking the gut and brain, suggesting that proper dietary intake is critical for mental health. Substance use disorder treatment protocols may benefit from including nutrition services as a treatment modality.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the connection between gastrointestinal health and mental health, particularly as it related to alcoholand opiates.
  2. Explain the rationale behind offering nutrition services in addiction treatment settings
  3. Apply  knowledge learned about the importance of nutrition for addiction recovery at theirworkplace or treatment center.

 

More information here

Friday July 27, 2018 10:15am – 11:45am

The Adolescent and Young Adult Collective

Los Angeles, CA July 26- July 27, 2018

TITLE: Nutrition for Mental Health: Understanding the Gut-Brain Axis

David Wiss MS RDN 

DESCRIPTION

With a changing food environment and an evolving human brain, adolescents and young adults are facing new challenges in developing a meaningful relationship to food. Most recently, we have discovered that the microorganisms inhabiting our gastrointestinal tract (the “second brain”) impact mental well-being. Do we need educational protocols for the second brain? This presentation will discuss the implications of gut health and the importance of nutrition in recovery from substance use disorders, eating disorders, depression, and anxiety.

More information here

Sunday October 21, 2018 1:30pm-3:00pm

The Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo (FNCE)

Washington, D.C. October 20-23, 2018

TITLE: Nutrition Interventions Amidst an Opioid Epidemic: The Emerging Role of the RDN

David Wiss MS RDN 

DESCRIPTION

The evolving opioid crisis continues to create a devastating impact on individuals, families, communities, and the healthcare system. Emerging evidence supports the positive impact of nutrition interventions during recovery from alcohol and drug abuse. This presentation will outline the various roles of the RDN as a member of the treatment team.

More information here

Tuesday November 13, 2018 1:00pm-2:30pm

American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting

San Diego Convention Center, November 10-14, 2018

TITLE: Nutrition Interventions for Substance Use Disorder Recovery

David Wiss MS RDN 

DESCRIPTION

With substance use disorder rates rising, there is an urgent need for new and effective treatment modalities. The utilization of nutrition services in addiction treatment has not been standardized, but there is a growing trend towards incorporating registered dietitian nutritionists into the treatment team. Nutrition therapy should address the most serious medical and nutritional conditions first and then target the psychological and behavioral aspects of eating. This comprehensive overview explores the impact of alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, and opioids on nutritional status. This presentation places particular emphasis on gut health, microbiome, and associated neural interactions. Homeostatic and hedonic mechanisms of eating behavior are discussed in the context of eating disorders and food addiction. In summarizing the available published evidence on human subjects, a case is made for both individual nutrition counseling and group education, as well as the implementation of food service guidelines in treatment settings. Given the current crisis of addictive disorders, consideration should be given to prioritizing efforts to improve eating habits and overall health in recovery programs. By promoting positive recovery outcomes, nutrition may reduce costs and improve resource allocation. Public health measures promoting nutrition standards in treatment settings should be implemented. Guidelines for nutrition interventions will be proposed, and a summary of where more information is needed will point towards future directions.

More information here

More events to be posted soon!

We hope to see you at one of these conferences!

 

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FNCE 2017 Reflection

FNCE 2017 Thoughts and Recap

I have attended the Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo for the past several years. Traditionally I have attended as a representative of Dietitians for Professional Integrity, which is an advocacy group we formed back in 2013, to promote responsible and ethical sponsorship within the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. In 2016 I wrote a recap which highlights concerns around industry-sponsored continuing professional education (CPE) units for registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs).  FNCE 2017 was a celebration of 100 years and this theme was certainly central at the event.

I was not planning to attend this year but was alerted that I had won an award, so felt an obligation to show up! My award was for “Excellence in Practice” for Addictions and was presented by the Behavioral Health Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group. The award was presented at a breakfast at 6:30am Monday morning. There was also awards given to an RDN for excellence in practice in eating disorders, mental health, and intellectual and developmental disabilities. We all had a few minutes to give a speech and received little plaques. It’s always great to be recognized for accomplishments.

On Monday I went to a session called “Food Fraud” which was about deception in our food supply. Fake honey, mislabeled seafood etc. The focus was on seafood since there is much fraud happening globally. There is a website with more info. On Monday I spent an hour wondering the expo floor. It has improved from previous years, but of course Monsanto and The Sugar Association were present. It didn’t upset me like it has in the past, and I did not take photos since it is no surprise to anyone that these companies are here. Monday afternoon I attended a talk called “Intolerance vs. Avoidance” which discussed the intersection between food allergies and eating disorders. A certified eating disorder registered dietitian discussed common concerns around food allergies with restrictive patients and those with “orthorexia nervosa” while an MD gave some background on testing for food allergies.

Tuesday I went to talk on “Nutritional Genomics” where the speakers summarized the latest advances in the intersection between genetics and nutrition. They discussed a website called 23 and Me where one can send in a spit sample to get personalized nutrition information. Unfortunately, the recommendations are pretty generic, but I am still curious and will request a kit! The closing keynote was a physicist (Dr. Michio Kaku) who discussed “The Future of the Mind” where he outlined current advances that could revolutionize healthcare. I was most impressed by the contact lens with a screen on it. Digitized healthcare definitely sounds intriguing, but much of what he described seems like a potential disaster for mental and spiritual health. Overall, my experience for FNCE 2017 was different this year. I was not at the event as an undercover journalist. Just another RDN trying to make a difference in people’s lives…

 

FNCE 2017

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Food Addiction Video

Nutrition in Recovery is thrilled to announce our new monthly newsletter! Get the latest information on Nutrition for Addiction! Check out our second of many videos! This video is on food addiction.

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness.

We will be sending out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

We will only send out one video per month and you can unsubscribe at any time!

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered

Microbiome and Mental Health
Social Media and Body Image
ADHD and Disordered Eating
Trauma and Eating Disorders
Impulsivity and Decision Making
Night Eating Syndrome
Food Politics

Monthly Newsletter

Please SIGN UP HERE so you will not miss out on this revolutionary information!

Do you know someone who might be interested in the link between nutrition and mental health or any of the topics mentioned above? Please forward this to them so they can join us and don’t keep us a secret!

Thank you for all your support as we embark on the journey of improving the health and wellbeing of our clients and their loved ones.

Learn more about Food Addiction

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Nutrition in Recovery Monthly Newsletter

Monthly Newsletter

Nutrition in Recovery Monthly Newsletter

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness. Our monthly newsletter has finally arrived!

We’re thrilled to announce that we will be sending out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

We will only send out one video per month and you can unsubscribe at any time!

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered

 

Please SIGN UP HERE so you will not miss out on this revolutionary information!

Do you know someone who might be interested in the link between nutrition and mental health or any of the topics mentioned above? Please forward this to them so they can join us and don’t keep us a secret!

Thank you for all your support as we embark on the journey of improving the health and wellbeing of our clients and their loved ones.

David Wiss MS RDN

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PhD Public Health

David Wiss is in the Process of Earning his PhD Public Health from UCLA in the Department of Community Health Sciences!

His Personal Statement has been included here:

I am a working Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) with an academically focused private practice specializing in patients with challenging eating and substance use disorders. In addition, I supervise several educational groups at various addiction treatment centers throughout the Los Angeles area. My interest in this unique patient population led me to develop specialized dietary curriculum for people in early recovery. Currently, there are no “best practice” protocols. To this end, I am pursuing a PhD in Community Health Sciences in order to improve the impact of nutrition interventions in patients with various addictions, as well as develop curriculum for clinical practices on a larger scale. My overall aim is to reduce disordered eating in early recovery and to improve the quality of life for patients with disabling addictive disorders.

Introducing the concept of food and nutrition into an addiction treatment program is not an easy task. Many patients in early recovery are not ready for multiple health behavior changes, since most are simply trying to get past the immediate crisis of addiction and the associated life adjustments of abstinence. In fact, sobriety can magnify pre-existing dysfunctional eating behavior. Many patients began using drugs and alcohol in their early teens, and never developed a healthy relationship to food, and may have damaged their gut microbiota through the use of alcohol, pills, opiates, and other substances, creating significant barriers to nutrition interventions. Most are unaware of the links between nutrition and recovery. Meanwhile, an increasing number of people in recovery have reported that the inclusion of healthful food as a healing modality has been beneficial for their overall mood and mental acuity. In several of the treatment centers where I work, patients are surprised when they discover that making small nutritional changes (such as drinking water or eating breakfast) can impact energy levels, overall sense of wellness, and optimism about being sober.

Unfortunately, traditional medical insurance plans do not cover nutrition services for addiction recovery. This is in part due to a lack of objective evidence about the efficacy of nutrition interventions in addiction recovery. My goal is to develop evidence-based guidelines for nutrition interventions in substance use disorders, which will hopefully lead to new policies and protocols for nutrition standards. Specifically, I am proposing an investigation of various measurable outcomes such as weight changes, nutritional status, inflammatory markers, length of abstinence, quality of life, and self-efficacy, in individuals receiving nutrition education and life skills training (shopping, cooking) compared to individuals who do not (control group).

My Master’s Thesis “Nutrition and Substance Abuse” was a multidisciplinary (psychologists and dietitians) investigation into the special needs of patients with addiction/alcoholism in the Veterans Affairs healthcare system. The survey study examined differences between veterans (who were engaged in recovery) with a history of alcohol or drug abuse and those with no history, all of who were enrolled in a weight management program. One of the significant findings in the study was that individuals with a history of substance abuse reported more difficulty controlling their eating when they were depressed. This research was published internally and awarded the Carrie Latt Wiatt Scholarship by the Family & Consumer Sciences (Nutrition) department at California State University, Northridge (CSUN).

During my dietetic internship year, I spent four transformative months at UCLA Medical Center where I worked with the eating disorders unit. During this time, I also began to teach nutrition classes at local addiction treatment settings. It quickly became apparent that patients in most treatment centers do not receive targeted nutrition education. After graduation from CSUN in 2013, I opened a private practice to treat patients with addictions, eating disorders, and those struggling with weight management, body image, and mental health issues. I founded Nutrition in Recovery to offer a range of nutrition and wellness services to private sector addiction treatment centers. At this time I was also on staff at Breathe Life Healing Centers, developing their binge eating disorder program as Director of Nutrition. After years of working in the field, I feel ready to pursue a PhD degree at UCLA.

Since becoming a registered dietitian, I have continued to be involved in research and education. I have published two book chapters and two peer-reviewed journal articles on eating disorders and addictions. In the past three years I have chaired five webinars sponsored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics on topics related to my area of expertise.  Additionally, I serve as a consultant reviewer for the Journal of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. From 2012-2014 I was a member of the executive committee of the Behavioral Health Nutrition Dietetic Practice Group where I gained insight into the role of nutrition in the treatment of mental illness. As the Research and Grants Committee Chair for the Los Angeles District (California Dietetic Association) I created a video series about the importance (and lack) of research in dietetics. Since that time I have felt a strong determination to “be the change I wish to see” in the nutrition field, which means conducting original studies using validated research methodology. I am seeking the training and support from the UCLA School of Public Health to achieve these goals.

Personal career highlights of mine have included teaching opportunities at conferences, hospitals, and at local universities. In my private practice I am a preceptor for numerous dietetic interns, where I can “give back” as well influence the future of my field. For several years I have volunteered at the United States District Court in downtown Los Angeles teaching nutrition courses to post-guilty-plea defendants in the conviction and sentence alternatives (CASA) program. This work with underserved populations in the criminal justice system has created a sense of purpose and duty that I would like to develop further. This experience has led me to believe that an academic career would complement and fulfill my life’s mission: to use nutrition to help people.

I am also proud to be a co-founder of an organization called Dietitians for Professional Integrity. We are a group of concerned dietetic professionals looking to advance our profession and credential through advocacy for greater financial transparency and ethical sponsorships within the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Our efforts and dialogues with other dietitians and our Academy leadership have spurred policy changes regarding industry-sponsored educational sessions at our annual Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo. We believe the American public deserves nutrition information that is not tainted by the questionable interests of the food industry, who funds most of the nutrition research in the United States. With publication bias and ways of spinning conclusions in favor of their agenda (profit), the food industry has succeeded in undermining public health initiatives to reduce intake of high-energy foods with very little nutritional value. There is more advocacy work to be done and I am highly motivated to conduct innovative research within the emerging framework of food addiction. From my perspective, the Community Health Sciences Program at UCLA offers me an excellent pathway to advance these goals.

Another goal in obtaining a doctorate from the UCLA Department of Community Health Sciences is to broaden my knowledge and skill set in order to evaluate and interpret complex data using statistical analysis. Advanced graduate training will improve my ability to think in a formal, logical, and structured way, and to assess needs on a population level. In recent years, research that demonstrates a connection between food and addiction has gained momentum and increased public attention. I have been called to contribute to our understanding of how brain chemistry, hormones, and gut microbes influence human behavior. My aim is to bridge this gap and establish a better scientific basis for nutrition in recovery. Traditionally, we have looked at eating disorders as individual (and family) issues, but now is the opportunity to further understand them as public health issues.

Addiction and eating disorders are both major public health problems worldwide. There are numerous questions that relate to food, addiction, eating disorders, and recovery that remain unanswered. Can nutrition be used to improve addiction outcomes? What is the best practice for treating co-occurring eating and substance use disorders? How can dietitians help with recovery from mental health disorders? What policy implications can address food addiction on a societal level? What new programs can be developed for underserved populations that struggle with addiction and nutrition-related challenges?

The UCLA School of Public Health will provide an opportunity to investigate some of these questions, which will hopefully translate into more effective health policies that could impact the way we treat addiction and eating disorders. In order for nutrition in addiction treatment to improve, we need strong leadership and unbiased data. My goal in pursuing a doctorate in public health is to produce data that guides treatment. I am confident that my work in this area will create strong evidence to improve funding for nutrition services, creating opportunities for dietitians to work in publicly-funded as well as underserved addiction treatment centers. Dietitians desperately need more evidence of effectiveness in order to advance our profession. With new information it may be possible to change the way we approach addiction treatment, but more importantly to improve the recovery process amidst the current addiction crisis.

PhD Public Health

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Public Health Private Profits Conference

Public Health Private Profits

Public Health Private Profits One Day Conference April 1, 2017

The Los Angeles District (LAD) of the California Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics presents our first annual conference on April 1, 2017 at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. The conference is titled “Public Health and Private Profits: A Dialogue about Critical Topics Shaping the Future of the Dietetic Profession”

We are beyond excited to host this event to discuss issues which we feel are of paramount importance to our profession, and are not being adequately addressed at the state and national conferences.

The event is approved for 5.5 CPEs for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists

Learning Codes Covered:

1050: ETHICS
1070: LEADERSHIP, CRITICAL & STRATEGIC THINKING
2040: FOOD SCIENCE, GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD
5200: DISORDERED EATING

 Public Health Private Profits

Topics which will be discussed include:

Corporate Sponsorship

GMOs

Food Addiction

Speakers:

Opening Keynote:

Michele Simon, JD, MPH “Avoiding Conflicts of Interest When Working in the Public’s Interest”

Corporate Sponsorship:

Bonnie Y. Modugno, MS, RDN, CLE “Selling my Time, not my Integrity”

Andy Bellatti, MS, RDN “Public-Private Partnerships: A Political Slippery Slope”

GMOs:

Amanda Maxham, PhD “Why GMOs are a Good Thing”

Melinda Hemmelgarn, MS, RDN “GMOs: What Dietitians Need to Know”

Food Addiction:

Peter Pressman, MD “Food Addiction: Clinical Reality or Mythology”

David A. Wiss, MS, RDN “Food Addiction: What Dietitians Need to Know”

Register for the Conference HERE

Conference Website HERE

 

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David Wiss Quoted – FNCE 2016

FNCE 2016

The Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo (FNCE) is the largest nutrition conference of the year. This year FNCE 2016 was in Boston October 15-18. View the sessions from 2016 HERE and the exhibitors HERE. Mr. David Wiss attended this year, presenting his poster “Hands-on Nutrition and Culinary Intervention Within a Substance Use Disorder Residential Treatment Facility” with Kristie Moore MS RDN

Nutrition in Recovery

Nutrition in Recovery

David also attended FNCE 2016 to carry out an important mission spurred by Dietitians for Professional Integrity, which is to elevate the public perception of the dietitian credential by severing ties with problematic food companies. Mr. Wiss wrote an important guide for fellow attendees HERE.This document highlights five 2016 FNCE sessions with conflicts of interest that concern us, particularly in regards to speakers who have industry ties that directly relate to the topics they are speaking about.

The Aftermath

Mr. Wiss generated a report after the conference, stating: “We recommend a vetting process to ensure that the companies and trade groups at the expo hall are appropriate for a nutrition conference. Some may argue that the presence of purveyors of highly processed foods is necessary so dietitians can be aware of products our clients may come across. However, we can easily remain aware of that by visiting company websites or simply perusing the aisles of local grocery stores. At least that way we are not learning about a new product via a company rep that has been given talking points to specifically market the product.” Read the full recap HERE.

While at FNCE, Mr. David Wiss was interviewed by a member of the Associated Press who published an important article: Do Candy and Soda Makers Belong at a Dietitian Conference? Mr. Wiss states that conflict of interest has “been an important topic in the pharmaceutical world, and now it’s becoming a much more important topic in the nutrition world.” Other articles reporting on the conference discussed close ties between nutritionists and the food industry, and how many nutritionists want to sever those ties.

Final Thoughts

FNCE 2016 was a lot of fun! We networked, attended some great sessions, and continued to advocate for a future that is not riddled with industry influence. We are thrilled with the progress made in the last three years.

It is encouraging to see incremental changes at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics annual conference.

We have also identified the following areas for improvement:

1. Discontinue CPEs for industry-sponsored educational sessions

2. Implement a vetting process for expo hall exhibitors that examines companies not just by the products they sell, but also by their political actions (i.e.: what do they lobby for/against?)

3. Acknowledge well-researched and thoroughly documented issues surrounding bias and influence so we can address them cohesively as a profession.

DFPI Button supporter

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West Los Angeles Dietitian

Nutrition in Recovery

Dave Cannon, Kristie Moore, and David Wiss

What is it like to be a West Los Angeles Dietitian in 2016?

The field of dietetics is changing rapidly. I have done much reflecting on this lately. Much of the information I was taught in school is entirely obsolete. Much of it was never true in the first place. I am really proud of the work we have done as Dietitians for Professional Integrity attempting to make an impact on the corrupt nature of corporate sponsorship within the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. While we have not made much of an impact on the national level, we have made a splash at the local level, particularly in the Los Angeles District (LAD). As a West Los Angeles Dietitian and proud member of LAD, I have made a few short informational videos worth watching. The first is about Corporate Sponsorship and the second is about Food Industry Front Groups.

Staying on the Cutting Edge

Thinking about my journey over the last several years, I am very grateful for my Master’s training at California State University, Northridge. My experience doing a Thesis has positioned me to be a critical evaluator of the latest research in the fields of nutrition, neuroscience, endocrinology, microbiome, addictions, eating disorders, and more! My first real interest was in the concept of Food Addiction and then I became obsessed with hormones. In 2014 I released an intense article called Hormones and Addiction and recorded a webinar on this fascinating topic. In 2015 I presented a webinar called Nutrition Therapy for the Addicted Brain through the International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals. This presentation has been given in several different settings and is the basis of the work we do at Nutrition in Recovery. The webinar is free to view, and I hope you take advantage of it HERE

Excellent Teamwork

Being a training site for RDNs and DTRs has been critical to the growth of the company. Kristie Moore was David Wiss’ first dietetic intern and the magic has continued since that collaboration many years ago. Kristie and David even did research at Breathe Life Healing Centers for Kristie’s Thesis. Read all about in a recent article of the Behavioral Health Nutrition Newsletter. This concept of Hands-on Nutrition for addiction recovery is something we plan to develop more in this upcoming year. Read more about it HERE. Dave Cannon was also an intern with Nutrition in Recovery, and has since joined the team offering his expertise with group facilitation, personal training, in-home cooking instructions, and so much more. Dave Cannon has brought incredible value to the NIR team. Currently we have several other students rotating soon, and two more Master’s Thesis’ on the way. Stay tuned!

Keeping a Strong Presence

This work that we do truly is an uphill battle. It is very difficult to revamp food service systems in addiction treatment centers. There is resistance from the clients and resistance from the staff. It takes persistent and belief in our message. And we have that! So David Wiss gets his name out there in cyberspace to spread the word about the Nutrition in Recovery movement. Read a very potent blog article with a sample meal plan HERE. Mr. Wiss believes that the future of treatment will address addictions and eating disorders concurrently and simultaneously. This concept of integrated treatment is very important at Nutrition in Recovery. Listen to David talk about it on RadioMD.

West Los Angeles

West LA is the hub of many addiction treatment centers. We have helped so many programs integrate nutrition counseling. There are so many more that need our help! Contact us today and see how we can be improve the quality of your recovery!

 

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