Research

Los Angeles Conference April 6, 2019

“Dialectics in Dietetics: Multiple Truths in Nutrition Science” Conference April 6, 2019

History of the Conference

At the Los Angeles District of the California Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics annual transition meeting in the summer of 2016, we had a big idea. What if we could throw our own conference?

In 2017 we actually did it and it was epic! Our first conference was called “Public Health and Private Profits: A Dialogue about Critical Topics Shaping the Future of the Dietetic Profession”

Our 2018 conference was called “One Size Does Not Fit All: Promoting Diverse Perspectives in Dietetics” and was also SOLD OUT.

Our April, 6 2019 conference should be the best one yet! “Dialectics in Dietetics: Multiple Truths in Nutrition Science.” We are so thrilled to have such a star-studded line-up this year! The conference is held at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and is not to be missed!

April 6, 2019
http://www.ladannualconference.org

We have special pricing for students, RDNs, and LAD members!

Register for the conference HERE

April 6 will be here before we know it!

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Changes After Bariatric Surgery? Video

How does taste change after bariatric surgery?

David Wiss MS RDN walks you through some of the latest research related to changes in taste following bariatric surgery. How is that possible? Evidence suggests alterations in gut microbiota following certain procedures may be responsible for changes in food preferences for some people. It appears that the gut-brain axis can explain so many of the questions we still have about nutrition and health.

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness.

We send out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered:

Child Nutrition

Circadian Rhythms

Men and Eating Disorders

View last month’s video on Alcohol and HbA1c

Does Alcohol Affect HbA1c?
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Does Alcohol Affect HbA1c? Video

How does alcohol affect HbA1c?

David Wiss MS RDN describes the relationship between alcohol and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) from a biospsychosocial perspective. Alcohol lowers HbA1c levels significantly and many researchers have concluded that alcohol is protective against T2DM. Sounds strange doesn’t it? What are the mechanisms? Is it the alcohol itself or is it people who drink alcohol? Are group differences in this relationship due to social or biological factors? Until more research is done, we have more questions than answers. Find out what we do know here and next time someone asks “does alcohol affect HbA1c?” you will be ready to chime in!

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness.

We send out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered:

Bariatric Surgery

Child Nutrition

Circadian Rhythms

Men and Eating Disorders

View last month’s video on Vaping and Disordered Eating

Does Alcohol Affect HbA1c?
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Nutrition Interventions Amidst an Opioid Crisis

Nutrition Interventions Amidst an Opioid Crisis

“Nutrition Interventions Amidst and Opioid Crisis: The Emerging Role of the RDN” by David Wiss MS RDN

The opioid crisis has reached epidemic proportions. The time to include nutrition into the treatment paradigm has arrived. David Wiss is not afraid to take the lead, and is doing research on this topic at the University of California, Los Angeles. 

This presentation was given at the Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo (FNCE) on Sunday October 21, 2018 in Chicago which was an invited presentation in response to the opioid crisis. Here David Wiss describes the impact of opioids on nutritional status and gastrointestinal health, identifies common disordered and dysfunctional eating patterns common to opioid-addicted populations, and describes nutrition therapy protocols for specific substances including opioids and for poly-substance abuse.

The presentation is 1:29:01 and was moderated by my dear friend and colleague Tammy Beasley, RDN. If you want to skip the video, and go straight to the slides, you can do so HERE. 

In summary, nutrition interventions have not yet been standardized or widely implemented as a treatment modality for substance use disorder (SUDs). Emphasis should be placed on gastrointestinal health, and reintroduction of foods high in fiber and antioxidants such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, and seeds. Adequate intake of protein and omega-3 essential fatty acids should be consumed daily. Regular meal patterns can help to stabilize blood sugar. Water should replace sweetened beverages. Caffeine and nicotine intake should be monitored. Dietary supplements can be very helpful in the recovery process, but should not supplant whole foods. Once nutrition behavior has improved, use of dietary supplements should be reevaluated. Lab tests and stool samples assessing gut function should provide valuable insights in upcoming years. In addition to expertise with the interaction between specific substances and nutritional status, RDNs working in treatment settings should specialize in gastrointestinal health, eating disorders, and should be current with food addiction research. There is a timely need for specialized nutrition expertise in SUD treatment settings, including outpatient clinics and “sober living” environments. Public health campaigns and specialized training programs targeting primary care physicians, mental health professionals, and other SUD treatment professionals are warranted. 

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Journal Articles by David Wiss

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles by David A. Wiss MS RDN

(ORCID Link Takes You Directly To The Articles)

Wiss, D. A., Avena, N., & Rada, P. (2018). Sugar addiction: From evolution to revolution. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 9(545). doi:10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00545

Wiss, D. A., Schellenberger, M., & Prelip, M. L. (2018). Rapid assessment of nutrition services in Los Angeles substance use disorder treatment centers. Journal of Community Health. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-018-0557-2

Wiss, D. A., Schellenberger, M., & Prelip, M. L. (In Press). Registered dietitian nutritionists in substance use disorder treatment centers. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2017.08.113

Wiss, D. A., Criscitelli, K., Gold, M., & Avena, N. (2017). Preclinical evidence for the addiction potential of highly palatable foods: Current developments related to maternal influence. Appetite.doi:10.1016/j.appet.2016.12.019

Wiss, D. A., & Brewerton, T. B. (2016). Incorporating food addiction into disordered eating: The disordered eating and food addiction nutrition guide (DEFANG). Eating and Weight Disorders. doi:10.1007/s40519-016-0344-y

Wiss, D. A., & Waterhous, T. S. (2014). Nutrition therapy for eating disorders, substance use disorders, and addictions. In Brewerton, T. D., & Dennis, A. B., Eating disorders, substance use disorders, and addictions (pp. 509-532). Heidelberg, Germany: Springer Publishing.

Specter, S. E., & Wiss, D. A. (2014). Muscle dysmorphia: Where body image obsession, compulsive exercise, disordered eating, and substance abuse intersect in susceptible males. In Brewerton, T. D., & Dennis, A. B., Eating disorders, substance use disorders, and addictions (pp. 439-457). Heidelberg, Germany:Springer Publishing.

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Is There Science to Sugar Addiction?

Is There Science to Sugar Addiction???

I know, I know, I know…food addiction and sugar addiction are controversial topics, especially in the eating disorder community, where any kind of “diet” beliefs or behaviors are viewed as harmful. I agree that many of the proponents of sugar addiction and food addiction carry a very punitive “food negative” message. Is there a way to accept the science of food addiction AND be “eating disorder friendly” at the same time??? That takes skill. One has to be able to hold multiple things true at the same time, and separate emotions and personal bias from their work. But it can be done!!! In fact, it HAS TO be done!
The revolution is now.

Our latest publication: “Sugar Addiction: From Evolution to Revolution” has been recently published in the prestigious Frontiers in Psychiatry. I will say this was the hardest peer-review I have ever gotten through! It is published OPEN ACCESS so download it HERE. For those who work with eating disorders, there is a special section to address the controversies! Enjoy! Feedback always welcomed.

Is There Science to Sugar Addiction?

Want to learn more about Food Addiction? Check out our FAQ page on it.

Want to learn more about Eating Disorders? We got that too.

Nutrition in Recovery specializes in the nutritional management of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, and weight management. We offer group education and individual counseling. We love to help people finally make peace with food and exercise. Nutrition in Recovery also offers general wellness services, sports nutrition, and medical nutrition therapy for various chronic diseases, including gastrointestinal issues. Whatever brings you into our office, we are prepared to help you on your journey to recovery.

We pride ourselves on being flexible with different food philosophies. We do not believe that any single food philosophy works for all people. In fact, we think that only having one food philosophy is not scientific. We are skilled in making an individual assessment in order to figure out the best treatment approach for you. We have a team of experts at Nutrition in Recovery and can therefore get you in touch with the best person for your specific needs.

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Vaping & Disordered Eating Video

Nutrition in Recovery is thrilled about our new monthly newsletter! Get the latest information on Nutrition for Addiction and Disordered Eating! Check out our latest video on Vaping!

This video is about Vaping, which can impact appetite, and be used for weight loss and control. In other words, vaping is linked to disordered eating. Exactly how can vaping relate to disordered eating? Find out the specifics!

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness.

We send out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered:

Bariatric Surgery

Child Nutrition

Circadian Rhythms

Men and Eating Disorders

View last month’s video on Attentional Bias & Disordered Eating

About Nutrition in Recovery 3

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Conflict of Interest in Nutrition Research

Conflict of Interest in Nutrition Research

There is a growing concern about bias and conflict of interest in the nutrition research landscape. Given the influence of systematic review and meta-analysis on nutrition policy, it has been suggested that industry sponsorship can undermine the integrity of nutrition research by investing heavily in studies that support their products and skew the systematic review process [1-3]. Out of 206 articles in a 2007 search, 111 declared financial sponsorship and the odds ratio of a favorable versus unfavorable result was 7.61 when comparing articles with all industry funding to no industry funding [2]. A systematic review of systematic reviews regarding the association between SSBs and weight gain found that those reviews with conflict of interest were five times more likely to present a conclusion of no positive association than those without [4]. A search of obesity-related arguments made by the food industry in major newspapers found suggestions that industry is “part of the solution” in 33% of the articles [5]. Other themes in the reframing of obesity included that government intervention is overreaching (25%), that products are not responsible (24%), that individuals are not responsible (15%), and that obesity is not a problem (3%) [5]. Not surprisingly, similar biases stemming from study sponsorship on the relationship between artificially sweetened beverages and weight have been found [6]. Dr. Marion Nestle has argued that corporate funding of food and nutrition research can seem more like marketing than science [7]. There exists an urgent need for improved disclosure practices and refined methods for evaluating studies used in systematic reviews. Given the obesity crisis and growing food addiction problem, reducing corporate sponsors from driving research agendas should be considered both a high public health and journal editorial board priority.

For more information on Conflict of Interest in Nutrition Research, check out our Dietitians for Professional Integrity Homepage

Dietitians for Professional Integrity 2

  1. Katan, M.B., Does industry sponsorship undermine the integrity of nutrition research?PLoS Med, 2007. 4(1): p. e6.
  2. Lesser, L.I., et al., Relationship between funding source and conclusion among nutrition-related scientific articles.PLoS Med, 2007. 4(1).
  3. Lucas, M., Conflicts of interest in nutritional sciences: The forgotten bias in meta-analysis.World J Methodol, 2015. 5(4): p. 175-8.
  4. Bes-Rastrallo, M., et al., Financial conflict of interest and reporting bias regarding the association between sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: A systematic review of systematic reviews.PLoS Med, 2013. 10(12).
  5. Nixon, L., et al., “We’re Part of the Solution”: Evolution of the Food and Beverage Industry’s Framing of Obesity Concerns Between 2000 and 2012.Am J Public Health, 2015. 105(11): p. 2228-36.
  6. Mandrioli, D., C.E. Kearns, and L.A. Bero, Relationship between Research Outcomes and Risk of Bias, Study Sponsorship, and Author Financial Conflicts of Interest in Reviews of the Effects of Artificially Sweetened Beverages on Weight Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Reviews.PLoS One, 2016. 11(9): p. e0162198.
  7. Nestle, M., Corporate Funding of Food and Nutrition Research: Science or Marketing?JAMA Intern Med, 2016. 176(1): p. 13-4.
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Attentional Bias Video

Nutrition in Recovery is thrilled to announce our new monthly newsletter! Get the latest information on Nutrition for Addiction and Disordered Eating! Check out our latest video on Attentional Bias!

This video is about Attentional Bias, which is the tendency for one’s perception to be affected by their recurring thoughts at the time. In other words, one’s bias towards noticing what they are already thinking of. How does Attentional Bias related to Disordered Eating? Find out!

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness.

We send out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered:

Vaping (E-cig)

Bariatric Surgery

Child Nutrition

Circadian Rhythms

Men and Eating Disorders

View last month’s video on Alcoholic Liver Disease

About Nutrition in Recovery 3

 

Read more

Journal Publication: Nutrition Services in Los Angeles Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Rapid Assessment of Nutrition Services in Los Angeles Substance Use Disorder Treatment

One of our research studies “Rapid Assessment of Nutrition Services in Los Angeles Substance Use Disorder Treatment Centers” was recently published in the Journal of Community Health.

We assessed the prevalence of nutrition services in Los Angeles treatment centers and found that is was quite low! The article offers some important ideas about the addiction crisis.

Much thanks to Maria Schellenberger and Dr. Michael Prelip for their assistance with this research.

Link to article: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10900-018-0557-2
Direct download HERE

Journal Publication: Nutrition Services in Los Angeles Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of nutrition services and utilization of registered dietitian nutritionists at substance use disorder treatment centers in Los Angeles. This cross-sectional descriptive study utilized phone interviews with facilities within a 25-mile radius of the Los Angeles metropolitan area using the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Treatment Services Locator to identify facilities that included a listing of substance abuse as primary focus of care (n=128). Facilities were asked if they offered any kind of nutrition services, the type of services that were offered, and the credential of the professional providing the services. We compared facilities that offered a residential level of care to those offering outpatient services only. The Fisher’s exact test was used to determine statistical significance. The study showed that only 39 sites (30.5%) offered any type of nutrition services on site, and the odds of a residential level of care offering nutrition services was 2.7 times higher than outpatient only facilities (p=0.02). Of the 39 facilities offering nutrition services, only 8 (20.5%) utilized a registered dietitian nutritionist. Overall fewer than 7% of the facilities utilized the services of a dietitian. Recovery programs for substance use disorder should consider using a registered dietitian nutritionist as a member of the treatment team, which may contribute to better clinical outcomes.

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