Weight Management

ADHD & Disordered Eating Video

Nutrition in Recovery is thrilled to announce our new monthly newsletter! Get the latest information on Nutrition for Addiction! Check out our fifth of many videos! This video is on ADHD and disordered eating!

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness.

We will be sending out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

We will only send out one video per month and you can unsubscribe at any time!

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered:

Trauma and Eating Disorders
Impulsivity and Decision Making
Night Eating Syndrome
Food Politics

View last month’s video on Social Media and Body Image

Monthly Newsletter

Please SIGN UP HERE so you will not miss out on this revolutionary information!

Do you know someone who might be interested in the link between nutrition and mental health or any of the topics mentioned above? Please forward this to them so they can join us and don’t keep us a secret!

Thank you for all your support as we embark on the journey of improving the health and wellbeing of our clients and their loved ones.

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Nutrition in Recovery Monthly Newsletter

Monthly Newsletter

Nutrition in Recovery Monthly Newsletter

Nutrition in Recovery is a group practice of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists and other health professionals who specialize in the treatment of addictions, eating disorders, body image, mental health, as well as general wellness. Our monthly newsletter has finally arrived!

We’re thrilled to announce that we will be sending out a monthly Newsletter summarizing the latest research linking nutrition and mental health. Each newsletter will include a short video with some helpful hints and actions you can implement to improve mental, spiritual, and physical wellbeing for yourself and for your clients. You will be among the first to hear the findings and insights from cutting-edge data, and we are providing references so you can do your own research if interested.

We will only send out one video per month and you can unsubscribe at any time!

Within the next year you can look forward to the following topics being covered

 

Please SIGN UP HERE so you will not miss out on this revolutionary information!

Do you know someone who might be interested in the link between nutrition and mental health or any of the topics mentioned above? Please forward this to them so they can join us and don’t keep us a secret!

Thank you for all your support as we embark on the journey of improving the health and wellbeing of our clients and their loved ones.

David Wiss MS RDN

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DEFANG Video

DEFANG Video by David Wiss MS RDN

The Disordered Eating Food Addiction Nutrition Guide (DEFANG) was published in November 2016 in the Journal of Eating and Weight Disorders. The paper was designed to help sort out some of the confusion around food addiction, as it relates to eating disorder treatment. This video is a very brief summary of the paper. The paper has been published with open access to feel free to download it HERE.

DEFANG Abstract

Although not formally recognized by the DSM- 5, food addiction (FA) has been well described in the sci- entific literature. FA has emerged as a clinical entity that is recognized within the spectrum of disordered eating, par- ticularly in patients with bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder and/or co-occurring addictive disorders and obe- sity. Integrating the concept of FA into the scope of dis- ordered eating has been challenging for ED treatment professionals, since there is no well-accepted treatment model. The confusion surrounding the implications of FA, as well as the impact of the contemporary Westernized diet, may contribute to poor treatment outcomes. The purpose of this review is twofold. The first is to briefly explore the relationships between EDs and addictions, and the second is to propose a new model of conceptualizing and treating EDs that incorporates recent data on FA. Since treatment for EDs should vary based on individual assessment and diagnosis, the Disordered Eating Food Addiction Nutrition Guide (DEFANG) is presented as a tool for framing treatment goals and helping patients achieve sustainable recovery.

DEFANG Fig. 1 Download

Do you have thoughts about food addiction that you want to share with David Wiss?

Do you think the food addiction framework is not valid?

Do you believe that this information conflicts with eating disorder treatment?

What do you think are the next steps in establishing the addiction framework around food?

Email your thoughts to: DavidAWiss@NutritionInRecovery.com

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Food Addiction in Appetite Journal

David Wiss MS RDN article on Food Addiction in Appetite Journal

Appetite Journal

“Preclinical Evidence for the Addiction Potential of Highly Palatable Foods: Current Developments Related to Maternal Influence”

David A. Wiss, Kristen Criscitelli, Mark Gold, Nicole Avena

Abstract

It is well established that obesity has reached pandemic proportions. Over the last four decades the prevalence of obesity and morbid obesity have risen substantially in both men and women worldwide. Although there are many causative factors leading to excessive weight gain including genetics and sedentary lifestyle, the transformation of the food environment has undoubtedly contributed to the dangerously high rates of obesity. The current food landscape is inundated with food engineered to contain artificially high levels of sugar and fat. Overconsumption of these types of food overrides the homeostatic mechanisms, which under normal circumstances regulate appetite and body mass, leading to hedonic eating. Evidence from the animal literature has illustrated nutrition-influenced perturbations that occur within the mesolimbic dopamine pathway, as well as maladaptive behavioral responses that result from chronic ingestion of highly palatable foods. These neurobehavioral adaptations are similar to what is observed in drugs of abuse. Recent evidence also supports that maternal exposure to these foods is capable of provoking neurobehavioral alterations in offspring. Therefore the purpose of this review is to summarize the current developments on the addictive potential of highly palatable foods, as well as illuminate the impact of maternal hyperphagia and obesity on the reward-related neurocircuitry and addiction-like behaviors in the offspring.

Thoughts from Mr. Wiss…

It was quite an honor to work with Dr. Mark Gold and Dr. Nicole Avena, who are both considered pioneers in the area of food addiction research. To describe Food Addiction in Appetite Journal is considered a major contribution to the field. Excited to see what the next publication will be!

Full article available HERE

Another recent article by David Wiss titled “Incorporating Food Addiction into Disordered Eating: The Disordered Eating Food Addiction Nutrition Guide (DEFANG) available for download HERE

Food Addiction

 

 

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DEFANG

Wiss DEFANG (Download)

Incorporating Food Addiction into Disordered Eating: The Disordered Eating Food Addiction Nutrition Guide (DEFANG)

David A. Wiss, MS, RDN; Nutrition in Recovery LLC
Timothy D. Brewerton, MD, DFAPA, FAED, DFAACAP, HCEDS; Medical University of South Carolina

DEFANG Abstract

Although not formally recognized by the DSM- 5, food addiction (FA) has been well described in the sci- entific literature. FA has emerged as a clinical entity that is recognized within the spectrum of disordered eating, par- ticularly in patients with bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder and/or co-occurring addictive disorders and obe- sity. Integrating the concept of FA into the scope of dis- ordered eating has been challenging for ED treatment professionals, since there is no well-accepted treatment model. The confusion surrounding the implications of FA, as well as the impact of the contemporary Westernized diet, may contribute to poor treatment outcomes. The purpose of this review is twofold. The first is to briefly explore the relationships between EDs and addictions, and the second is to propose a new model of conceptualizing and treating EDs that incorporates recent data on FA. Since treatment for EDs should vary based on individual assessment and diagnosis, the Disordered Eating Food Addiction Nutrition Guide (DEFANG) is presented as a tool for framing treatment goals and helping patients achieve sustainable recovery.

DEFANG Fig I (Download)

This publication is Open Access and can be viewed and downloaded online HERE

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David Wiss YouTube Interview

David Wiss YouTube Interview

Liv’s Recovery Kitchen interviews David Wiss, of Nutrition in Recovery. Liv delves into how nutrition can impact recovery from addiction and alcoholism. David provides a very insightful overview into how to adopt a realistic approach to nutrition, the prevalence of disordered eating, the adoption of substance-seeking behaviours in recovery and his new food group. Spend 20 minutes on another incredible David Wiss YouTube interview.

Liv’s YouTube Channel HERE

Liv’s Recipes HERE

 

Other topics in this YouTube Video:

Proper Nutrition Messaging

Making Small Changes

Beans, Nuts, Seeds

Food Addiction

Eating Disorders

Body Image

Male Concerns

Exercise in Recovery

Liv's Recovery Kitchen

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Chia Seeds

Chia Seeds

In recent years, chia seeds have been growing in popularity. Remembered by many as a plant ordered off a late night infomercial, these little seeds have been found to be extremely beneficial if included in the diet. So if you aren’t currently including them in your daily routine, you may just want to start. Here’s why:

Dietary Fiber

Chia seeds are an excellent source of dietary fiber. Fiber adds bulk to the diet, and can make a person feel fuller, faster. This can help to control weight, and also helps to prevent constipation and aid in digestion. Foods that are high in fiber help to control blood sugar levels by slowing down the absorption rate into the bloodstream. Fiber also plays a role in a healthy heart, as it helps in reducing blood pressure, inflammation, and cholesterol levels.

Omega-3

These healthful fats are an important part of cell membranes throughout the body. They play a critical role in blood clotting and help to control inflammation. In addition, this type of dietary fat supports brain health and may assist with depression. The many benefits of Omega-3 fats are also linked to heart health. This type of fat can help to improve blood vessel function and may help to lower blood pressure and heart rate.

Vitamins and Minerals

Chia seeds are a great source of a number of different micronutrients. In particular, they are a wonderful source of the fat-soluble vitamin E, which helps immunity levels in the body. They are also a source of calcium, which the body needs for proper heart, muscle, and nerve function. Along with vitamin D, vitamin E can help to protect against cancer, diabetes, and high blood pressure.

How to Enjoy

Including chia seeds in your diet is a great habit to start, and it couldn’t be any easier. You don’t have to become a super chef or spend any extra time in the kitchen, all you have to do is add them to some things that you may already be eating. One simple way to incorporate them is by adding a 2 Tablespoons to a 16 or 20 ounce bottled water. After about 20 minutes, the seeds will absorb some of the water and expand. You can sip on this throughout the afternoon, and it will help to keep you full and energized until dinner. Other ways to enjoy include sprinkling on top of a salad, eating with yogurt, or as part of a smoothie.

One important thing to keep in mind is to integrate them into your diet slowly. If your diet is relatively low in fiber, it is ideal to increase the amount of chia in your diet gradually to decrease the chances of any gastrointestinal discomfort. If you want to do something great for yourself, start adding these powerful seeds daily. Your body and mind will thank you! Try white chia seeds! Black chia seeds are sooooo last year.

white chia seeds

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Exercise in Addiction Recovery

Exercise in Addiction Recovery

Exercise in Addiction Recovery

The Importance of Exercise In Addiction Recovery

For people struggling with alcoholism or drug addiction, the thought of life without a drink or drugs can seem almost impossible. The unfortunate reality is that the majority of individuals seeking help for their addiction problem will not find success for any sustained period of time. While the recovery rate for alcohol and chemical use disorders may be low, there is something that can be done to greatly increase the chances of kicking the habit once and for all. The good news is that the answer will not only help you to stay addiction-free over the long term, but it is inexpensive or free! So what is it?

Exercise

Have no fear; we are not talking about becoming an ultra-endurance athlete, a pumped up gym rat, or an Olympian. Just the simple inclusion of some physical activity can have a radical impact on your quality of life and chances of sobriety.

How Does It Work?

During active addiction, the drugs and alcohol that a person consumes have a large impact on a complex set of structures in the brain called the limbic system. This part of the brain is largely responsible for creating a person’s feelings and motivations. In short, this system plays a major role in how a person sees the world and subsequently behaves in it.

While substance abuse does warp and alter this brain system, exercise can actually have the opposite effect. A regular exercise routine helps to grow new cells in this area and put the brain in homeostasis. We know that drugs and alcohol impact chemicals in the body including serotonin and dopamine. For someone new in addiction recovery that is trying to rebalance these neurotransmitters, physical activity can help to speed up the process.

Post-Acute Withdrawal Symptoms (PAWS)

Prolonged substance abuse creates dependence, and with that comes a period of withdrawal when a person stops using. Some of the physical characteristics include shaking, extremes in body temperature, nausea, and vomiting. In addition to these physical ailments, there are other difficulties that can last from 5-10 days or as long as a year and a half. These are referred to as post-acute withdrawal symptoms or PAWS, and may include insomnia, depression, anxiety, irritability, trouble thinking clearly, and difficulty with coordination. Not only are these feeling uncomfortable, they are particularly dangerous for the recovering addict, as they can be contributing factors for relapse.

The great news is that you can be proactive in your recovery, and by adding exercise to your daily routine, you can have a serious impact on these symptoms. Physical activity, whether it be lifting weights or going for a jog can be used as a safety valve to help vent feelings of agitation and stress. By participating in activities like these, it gives a person time to separate from whatever situation is causing the agitation. This time spent physically moving can be a period to think instead of acting impulsively and potentially dangerously.

New Habits

Most people that are entering recovery did not arrive on a particularly positive note or a winning streak. In most cases, individuals that are newly sober reached this part of their life through a string of harmful consequences and hard times. This can have a negative impact on self-esteem and belief in one’s self.

The good news is that this particular area is one in which exercise can have a direct impact. By setting and reaching small goals with physical activity, a person may start to lay the foundation for winning behavior. Small successes with exercise can help to build confidence and lead to commitment and motivation in other areas of life. As self-efficacy increases, a person can continue to produce positive results as they gain confidence and handle situations as they arise.

When starting down the road to recovery, it is common that people find themselves with an abundance of extra time on their hands. During a person’s drinking or drug using career, the majority of the day was spent thinking about using, actively using, or recovering from using. In sobriety, there are suddenly a large number of hours each day that are unaccounted for. This down time, if not filled with something positive or healthful, can be potentially dangerous for the recovering addict. This extra time is perfect for an individual to start an exercise program. The less time a person spends on the couch thinking about the past, the better.

Where To Start

We know that exercise and being physically active can have a major impact on a person’s chances of staying sober, but where do you begin? The best way to implement a new workout routine is to be honest about where you are starting and have realistic goals. This may be as simple as a ten minute walk around the neighborhood a few times a week or going to play basketball for 20 minutes in the park. Try a few different activities and find one that you enjoy. The more fun that you are having being active, the more likely you are to stick with it.

Initially, being consistent is the most important thing when becoming more active. Stick with your program and give your body time to adjust. Keep your eyes on your goals and be as tenacious about healing yourself as you were about harming yourself. You will be amazed at just how different and wonderful your new life can be.

Of course there is a tendency for many addicts to take it too far. Be wary of exercise addiction. For more information, click HERE

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Incorporating Food Addiction into Disordered Eating: The Food and Weight Unit Spectrum Model (FWUSM)

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Incorporating Food Addiction into Disordered Eating: The Food and Weight Unit Spectrum Model (FWUSM)

David Wiss MS RDN, Founder of Nutrition in Recovery is presenting a poster on Saturday May 7th, 2016 at the International Conference on Eating Disorders in San Francisco, CA. The poster will be summarizing some of his life’s work- to increase awareness around food addiction. Food addiction has been very controversial, particularly in the eating disorder community. David has noticed that the classic eating disorder algorithm has been unsuccessful in integrating the latest research on food addiction into the treatment approach. In this presentation Mr. Wiss will review the literature and propose a model for incorporating food addiction into disordered eating. A new model will be proposed. The Food and Weight Unit Spectrum Model (FWUSM) was designed to help treatment providers and patients to conceptualize food addiction as a real framework to consider in the context of eating disorders and obesity. The FWUSM hopes to clear some of the confusion in the field.

Highlights

  1. Within the spectrum of disordered eating, food addiction is the least congruent with anorexia nervosa and therefore has different treatment goals.
  2. Within the spectrum of disordered eating, food addiction shares similarities with binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa, and therefore should be considered when developing treatment plans.
  3. The Food and Weight Unit Spectrum Model (FWUSM) was developed to guide treatment for eating disorder patients based on their relative orientation to anorexia nervosa vs. food addiction.

Abstract

Although not formally recognized by the DSM-5, food addiction (FA) has been well described in the eating disorder (ED) and obesity literature. FA has emerged as a clinical entity that is recognized within the spectrum of disordered eating, particularly in patients with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and co-occurring addictive disorders. Integrating the concept of FA into the scope of disordered eating has been challenging for ED treatment professionals since there is no well-accepted treatment model. The confusion surrounding the implications of FA, as well as the impact of the contemporary American diet, may contribute to poor treatment outcomes. The purpose of this review is twofold. The first is to explore the relationships between EDs and addictions, and the second to propose a new model of conceptualizing and treating EDs that incorporates recent data on FA. Since treatment for EDs should vary based on individual assessment and diagnosis, the Food and Weight Unit Spectrum Model (FWUSM) is presented as a tool for framing treatment goals and helping patients achieve sustainable recovery.

To request a copy and permission to use the FWUSM, please email David Wiss MS RDN at DavidAWiss@NutritionInRecovery.com 

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The Second Brain?

Second BrainThe Second Brain?

David Wiss MS RDN has been obsessed with the microorganisms for the past year. Is it possible they could be the second brain? He has had so many burning questions as a registered dietitian nutritionist working with addictions and eating disorders. These include:

  • Why are so many of us drawn to foods that can compromise our quality of life?
  • Why do some of us reject foods that can heal us?
  • Why are educational efforts alone often not sufficient to produce sustainable behavior change?
  • Why is it so challenging to develop a new relationship to food? 

 

Is it lack of willpower? Food addiction? Restrained eating and dieting? In search for answers to the questions, Mr. Wiss has had to investigate the new insights into the gut microbiota and behavioral health.

New Insights

Gut microbiota can have a significant impact on disease development, brain health, attenuation, memory, and learning (Matsumoto et al., 2013). Dysbiosis of the gut is associated with a reduction in the diversity of the microorganisms, whereas healthy guts have higher diversity (Belizario & Napolitano, 2015). Highly diverse microbial communities are more likely to expend energy and resources in competition whereas less diverse microbial communities have more resources for host manipulation (Alcock, Maley, & Aktipis, 2014). So how does the gut microbiota impact human behavior? Is it possible that they have much more influence than we ever imagine?

In 2014 Alcock and colleagues stated:

“We hypothesize that there has been a genomic arms race in which microbes have evolved genes to manipulate their hosts (particularly analogs of human signaling molecules such as neuropeptides and hormones) and corresponding host genes have evolved to prevent that manipulation where it conflicts with the host’s future interests.”

Authors proposed that gastrointestinal microbes could generate cravings for foods they specialize on, induce dysphoria until the host eats foods that enhance their fitness, acting as “microscopic puppetmasters.” Diagram from their publication below:

The Second Brain

 

These authors concluded:

  • Microorganisms are competing for nutritional resources
  • Evolutionary conflict between host & microbiota may lead to cravings and cognitive conflict regarding food choice
  • Exercising self-control over eating may be partly a matter of suppressing microbial signals that originate in the gut
  • Acquired taste may be due to acquisitions of microbes that benefit from that food
  • One way to change eating behavior is by intervening on the microbiota: FOCUS ON INCREASING MICROBIAL DIVERSITY

 

This information blew David’s mind and led him to researching this fascinating topic in great detail.

In April 2016 Mr. Wiss recorded a webinar with the Los Angeles District of the California Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that can be viewed HERE

You can get your microbiome analyzed at uBiome. For a 10% discount click HERE

References:

Alcock, J., Maley, C. C., & Aktipis, C. A. (2014). Is eating behavior manipulated by the gastrointestinal microbiota? Evolutionary pressures and potential mechanisms. Bioessays, 36, 940-949.

Belizario, J. E., & Napolitano, M. (2015). Human microbiomes and their roles in dysbiosis, common diseases, and novel therapeutic approaches. Frontiers in Microbiology, 6(1050).

Matsumoto, M., Kibe, R., Ooga, T., Aiba, Y., Sawaki, E., Koga, Y., & Benno, Y. (2013). Cerebral low-molecular metabolites influenced by intestinal microbiota: A pilot study. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience, 7(9).

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